Canine Cardiac Care

Canine Cardiac Care (2)

Moose the Young Man

This post was supposed to be about a charity dog walk that we were scheduled to participate in. As it turned out, the rain was relentless up to and including the day of the event. As a result, we did not attend due to the inclement weather. Instead, I will explain why Moose wasn’t cleared for the one-mile fun walk anyway.

Other than age-related hearing and vision loss, and a rare seizure, he’s in good shape for approaching 16. Although we thought he would be okay for the walk, his cardiologist thought it best that he remain a spectator.

Last August Moose had a heart murmur that jumped in severity overnight. Heart murmurs in dogs can fluctuate, but an increase so sudden raised alarm, so much so that our vet suggested that we make an appointment with a canine cardiologist immediately. It was all so sudden, and we were afraid we were losing him.

Moose underwent a battery of tests at a veterinary hospital, and at that time he was diagnosed with having a leaky heart valve. He didn’t require medication at the time, but his condition required monitoring and follow up. At a subsequent appointment in April, we learned that his condition worsened to where he was just in need of medicine for his degenerative chronic mitral valve disease. The drug he will take for the rest of his life should slow its progression, perhaps up to a year and a half. Given that Moose will be 16 in November, it’s possible that something besides his heart will take his life. The specialist assured us that Moose is nowhere near heart failure at this time.

So, out of an abundance of caution, it was the vet’s opinion that Moose skip the dog walk. While he was almost certain that Moose would be just fine, the fact is that he has been inactive for some time. Just as greyhounds are couch potatoes, so are their smaller counterparts, the Italian Greyhound. Moose and Red haven’t been to a playdate in years, and their walks around the neighborhood are few. We certainly didn’t want to put any undue strain on his heart, so we chose to exclude him from the walk. We couldn’t be happier with the treatment that Moose is receiving from the cardiologist. (Our primary vet rocks, too).

Moose’s heart may be beginning to fail, but I don’t think it’s through disease. His heart isn’t big enough to hold all the love he has to give. As the saying goes, to know him is to love him.

Canine Cardiac Care (2)

Moose the Old Man

Mother’s Day Madness

Mothers Day Madness (1)

Annie – Never a Mom

Happy Mother’s Day! Since my cats and dogs are all spayed and neutered, none of them have ever been parents, at least not since they came to live with us. However, when I was a kid, our pets sometimes came with surprises.

The first family cat I remember was Puff, a stray tabby with a chronic ear condition taken in by my parents. One day my mom was holding her when she felt something wet run down her arm. To her surprise, Puff’s water had broken, and we were about to have more than one cat in the house. It now made sense why Puff was spending so much time in a closet, as she likely planned to bring her babies into the world in the secluded space. She had three kittens, who later were all rehomed, and the new mom was spayed soon after to prevent any other unplanned pregnancies. (Puff was an indoor/outdoor cat at the time, which was common in those days). In fact, she had her surgery when we still had her kittens in the house. Our family dog, a male Beagle named Sam, took charge of her little ones in her absence. If any of them wandered too far, Sam would retrieve it, returning the wayward baby to the rest of its siblings.

When I was growing up, pet stores were the place to go for pocket pets. Today care is taken to identify the sex of the animals for sale. Some retail chains will carry either male or female, but not both. This was not always the case back then, when we brought home a golden hamster, a male I named Teddy. One day I asked my mom, “What are those pink things in Teddy’s cage?” It turns out that Teddy wasn’t the male hamster we expected. Those “pink things” were tiny, hairless babies. We kept Teddy, but her kids were taken to the pet store when they were old enough to be separated from her.

As I got older, the pets got bigger. Graduating from hamsters, we brought home a brown and white guinea pig I named Lucy from a local pet shop. It turns out that she was indeed the female I was promised, but we didn’t realize that she was carrying an added bonus when we brought her home.

One day I noticed that Lucy had a smaller version of herself in her enclosure, a tiny brown and white baby. She only had one little piggie, and when we verified that it was a female, we named her Suzy and kept the mother and daughter together.

If my memory is correct, that was the last time I got more than I bargained for when it came to pets and their unexpected offspring. Currently we have a parakeet that sometimes lays eggs, so I should probably change her name from Elvis to Priscilla. Unless she has been entertaining birds in her cage late at night, the eggs will never hatch, as she is the only bird in the house. So, no matter how many kids you may or may not have, I hope your Mother’s Day is filled with more mirth than madness.

Mothers Day Madness (2)

Tiki – Also Not a Mom